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You are here: News & Events News from All Over News From All Over Natural Habitat Loss and Pesticide Use - Major Causes for Declining Pollinator Populations

Natural Habitat Loss and Pesticide Use - Major Causes for Declining Pollinator Populations

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Chennai, November 21, 2011: Pollination management project managers and experts from Nepal and six other countries including India and Pakistan participated in the third International Work-planning Meeting and third International Steering Committee Meeting of Global Pollination Project, organized from November 14 to 19, 2011 in Kathmandu, Nepal. The meetings were organized jointly by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Nepal Government Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives (MoAC) with the support from Global Environment Facility (GEF) and UN Environment Program (UNEP). The Steering Committee meeting was entitled "Conservation and Management of Pollinators for Sustainable Agriculture, through an Ecosystem Approach".

According to a news report in My Republica dated November 21, 2011 Dr. Hari Dahal, National Coordinator of the Global Pollination Project, Nepal talking about the deliberations at the meetings, said: "More than 35 per cent of the total pollination is caused by animal pollinators. Due to growing threat to the existence of such pollination agents, food security in the world has come under severe risk. So, we agreed to come up with national programs to preserve them. ... Nepal has included a five-year 'Conservation and Management of Pollinators for Sustainable Agriculture through Ecosystem Approach' in Chitwan district as a pilot project in Nepal, with the $125,000 project cost supported by FAO."

The participants in the meetings identified encroachment in natural habitat and growing use of pesticides as the major causes behind the declining number of pollinators across the world.