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You are here: News & Events On the Research Front
Contains news items that are useful to beekeepers, bee research workers, honey processors, packers and others in the beekeeping industry

Cellphone Radiation Affects Honey Bees – Punjab University Chandigarh Study

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Pune, May 29, 2010 (sources: The Hindu dated May 28, 2010; The Financial Express dated May 28, 2010; Research Communication in Current Science Volume 98, No. 10, May 25, 2010): Butterflies, birds and bees and even plants – all are affected by electromagnetic fields created by cellphones and microwave towers used for telecommunication.

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Cow Urine Found to Help Control Microbial Infections in Bee Colonies

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Pune, May 15, 2010 (Sources: ANI news in Gaea Times dated May 6, 2010 and in India Vision dated May 6, 2010; Video News of NDTV entitled 'New Uses for Cow Urine'): Cow urine treatment controls microbial infections in developing brood. This is the finding of researchers at the Gobind Ballabh Pant Univeristy of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand, according to the ANI news report dated May 6, 2010.

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Laidlaw Honey Bee Research Laboratory Gets Big Boost!

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Pune, April 7, 2010 (source: University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources, News and Information Outreach, News release dated April 5, 2010): It is now the turn of Gimbal's Fine Candies, after Häagen-Dazs Ice Cream company in the USA (see News item  dated March 1, 2009 in this site), to introduce honey in its food products and donating funds for research on honey bees, particularly on the cause of and solution to the colony collapse disorder.

Five percent of the proceeds from the sale of Honey Lovers will benefit UC Davis honey bee research. Photo courtesy: Kathy Keatley Garvey, UC Davis Dept. Entomology

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Insulin Receptor Substrate Gene in Honey Bees Regulates their Food Choice

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Pune, April 4, 2010 (sources: Physiorg News dated April 1, 2010; RedOrbit News dated April 2, 2010; EurekAlert Public Release dated April 1, 2010): Animals in general regulate their internal metabolism so as to maintain their body health and functioning, responding appropriately when outside conditions change. For example, they can modulate their growth and energy consumption in response to nutrient availability, though they have distinct energy requirements. These regulating mechanisms are possible because of the feedback the brain receives about the external conditions.

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Large Indoor, Climate-controlled Honey Bee Flight Testing Facility at Queensland Brain Institute

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Pune, October 13, 2009 (source: University of Queensland, Australia Communications Media Release dated August 20, 2008; University of Queensland (UQ) news report dated March 5, 2008; UQ News, Issue 578, October 2008; Queensland Brain Institute Neuroscience News, Issue 7, November 2008; The Great Beyond, Nature Blog posting dated August 21, 2008):

“Bees have a brain the size of a sesame seed but they are proving to be a model species to study for their smart ‘minds', their amazing capacity to learn and remember things and for their astute sense of smell and vision,” so goes the University of Queensland news report on the work of Queensland Brain Institute's (QBI) Visual and Sensory Neuroscience Group at Brisbane, Australia. The group led by Professor Mandyam Srinivasan, is studying how the bee's brain works and how bees behave, fly, navigate and smell. Scientists from this 17-strong group have proved that bees and humans share up to 30 percent of the same genes, including many genes involved in brain function.

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