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You are here: News & Events On the Research Front
Contains news items that are useful to beekeepers, bee research workers, honey processors, packers and others in the beekeeping industry

Bees help fight Caterpillar Infestation of Crops they Pollinate!

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Pune, December 28, 2008 (source: Science Now Daily News, December 22, 2008, Current Biology Vol. 18, Issue 24, December 23, 2008): A recent research by Jürgen Tautz and Michael Rostás of the University of Würzburg in Germany shows that bees help the farmer in yet another way – by driving away potential infestation and damage by caterpillars of crops that the bees forage upon.

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Shimmering in Rockbees – a Key Defence Strategy

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Pune, September 21, 2008 (compiled by: MCS; sources: Journal PLoS ONE, September 2008, Volume 3, Issue 9, e3141*3; Science Daily September 15, 2008): Shimmering behaviour is observed in the eastern honey bee, Apis cerana, the cavity-nesting Borneo bee, A. nuluensis4, the dwarf bee, A. florea, and the rockbee, A. dorsata and is usually considered as a response to the danger posed to the colony by intruding predators or enemies.
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Biological Control of Varroa Mite Within Sight

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Pune, August 4, 2008 (compiled by: MCS): Scientists at the HortResearch, Auckland, a New Zealand-based science company, have succeeded in using a strain of the common insect fungus Metarhizium to treat Varroa mite infestation in bee hives, according to a news release of the company on August 1, 2008.

The fungus species Metarhizium anisopliae grows naturally in soils throughout the world and is known to infect over 200 insect species including termites (Wikipedia). It is used as a biological insecticide and is harmless to humans. This fungus, according the ARS Beneficial Insects Research Unit at Weslaco, Texas scientists doesnt harm bees or affect their queen's production.

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Honey Bees Have Lateralization of Visual Learning

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Pune, August 1, 2008: Letzkus and other researchers of the ARC Centre for Vision Science and Statistical Consulting Unit of the Australian National University, Canberra and ARC Centre for Excellence in Vision Science, Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland in Australia have, in their investigation on lateralization in honey bees, found1 that Apis mellifera worker bees learn a colour stimulus better with their right eye.
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Honey Bees, Like Humans, Have Lateralized Brains

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Pune, July 31, 2008 (source courtesy: Memory in Honeybees: What the right and left antenna tell the left and right brain. EurekAlert Press Release June 3, 2008): It is widely known that the right and left hemispheres of the brain perform different tasks. Lesions to the left hemisphere typically bring impairments in language production and comprehension, while lesions to the right hemisphere give rise to deficits in the visual-spatial perception, such as the inability to recognize familiar faces.

In the last few years, we have become used to the idea that functional asymmetry between the left and right sides of the nervous system is not unique to humans: fishes, amphibians, birds and mammals have functional and anatomical asymmetries.

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