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Neonicotinoid Pesticides Cause Honey Bee Deaths - Field Studies Show -- Indian Nutritional Security Can Also Be Affected

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Chennai, April 2, 2012 (Thanks to Arun Subramanian, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, USA and Sridhar Rao, Beekeeping Industry, KVIC, Mumbai for the news alerts): "A widely used insecticide can threaten the health of bumblebee colonies and interfere with the homing abilities of honeybees, according to a pair of new studies," reports the American Association for the Advancement of Science, USA (AAAS), publishers of the journal Science in its news release dated March 29, 2012. Both the studies - one on bumble bees* and the other on honey bees** - are  published online on March 29, 2012 at the Science Express Web site of the journal Science.

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Genetically Diverse Honey Bee Colonies are Healthier - Latest Study Reveals

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Chennai, March 14, 2012: A research paper* in the latest issue of the journal PLoS ONE gives interesting information on the association of the microbial communities and genetic constitution of the worker bees in a colony. Researchers from Wellesley College, Massachusetts, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA and from the Microbiology and Systems Biology Group, TNO, Zeist, the Netherlands in their study characterized active bacterial communities in genetically diverse and uniform honey bee colonies. They report in the Abstract of the paper: "Colony microbiotas differed substantially between sampling environment and were dominated by several anaerobic bacterial genera never before associated with honey bees, but renowned for their use by humans to ferment food. Colonies with genetically diverse populations of workers, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from greater microbial diversity, reduced pathogen loads, and increased abundance of putatively helpful bacteria, particularly probiotic genus Bifidobacterium". Following is reproduced from the News Release dated March 12, 2012 by Indiana University Newsroom, that gives details of the research and the findings.

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24th International Congress of Entomology, August 19-25, 2012 in Daegu, South Korea

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Chennai, March 12, 2012: Co-hosted by the Entomological Society of South Korea the XXIV International Congress of Entomology will be held between August 19 and 25, 2012 at Daegu, South Korea. Among the co-hosts is the Apicultural Society of Korea. The Scientific Program for the Congress includes two sessions on Apiculture topics: honey bee disease diagnostics and Current issues on apiculture.

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11th AAA International Conference, Terengganu, Malaysia

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Chennai, March 11, 2012 (Thanks to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Division of Entomology, Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Main Campus Chatha Jammu 180009, for the news alert): The 11th Asian Apicultural Association (AAA) Conference will be held during September 28 and October 2, 2012 at the Primula Hotel, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia.

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It is in the Genes! - They Control Honey Bee Scouts' Behavior of Seeking New Food Sources

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Chennai, March 10, 2012: In an investigation conducted at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Wellesley College, Wellesley, and at the Cornell University, Ithaca, USA, researchers found 'molecular underpinnings' of 'novelty-seeking behavior' among honey bees 'in their tendency to scout for food sources and nest sites'. The researchers say: 'food scouts showed extensive differences in brain gene expression relative to other foragers'. In a research article* published in the latest issue of Science, they report their interesting findings of differences in genes corresponding to the differences in behavior among honey bee foragers. Following is the News on the subject, released by the News Bureau of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

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